56: Get Unstuck, Trust Your Intuition – Jon Dwoskin

by | Jul 31, 2021

Succession
Stories
Podcast

Laurie Barkman talks with Jon Dwoskin, business coach and author of the Think Big Movement, about his experience selling his first company, and the cancer diagnosis that changed not only his career, but his outlook on life. Facing death head-on made Jon realize how his biggest fears were holding him back. Instead, he turned it into a mission helping people get unstuck. Be sure to listen for Jon’s actionable ideas for trusting your intuition and taking action on small things for big results in your life.

Listen in to learn more about:

  • The value of your gut quotient and the importance of listening to your intuition
  • Finding your unique abilities and tapping into them for success
  • Critical specific, measurable leading activities to prevent burnout and achieve fulfillment 
  • Getting unstuck and moving past fear
  • Little things that steer you to your big goals

Show Links:

Jon Dwoskin’s website

Connect with Laurie on LinkedIn

If you’re interested in exploring your succession options, take the next step to request a confidential meeting with Laurie.

Transcript:

Laurie Barkman:

Jon Dwoskin, thank you so much for joining me on Succession Stories. This is a special episode of the What’s Next series. As we’ve talked about before you coming on to the show, it’s a time for people who are thinking about transitions in their life, and I love having authentic conversations with people who have gone through a significant life transition, and brought it to the point in their life where they’re able to share their experience with other people to help them in their journey, and I think you’re the perfect person to have a conversation with so welcome.

Jon Dwoskin:

I appreciate that, Laurie. Thanks for having me.

Laurie Barkman:

Why don’t we start by you sharing a little bit about your background? Where you grew up, what are some of the formative things in your life?

Jon Dwoskin:

I appreciate you having me on the show and I love what you’re talking about, as far as just transitions, because when you’re younger, you think like, boom, boom, boom. But, as you get older, I’m going to be 49 this year, you realize that there’s no straight line to the career you ultimately end up in or what you end up doing. When you look at it in reverse, it’s so interesting, all the things that pop up along the way and the people that you meet, and tap into. I was talking about this with my cousin yesterday; you never know what’s going to be, but you’ve got to trust the universe. We were talking about this last night and I think as I look back, that was always an undercurrent. I didn’t realize it at the time but it was always kind of an undercurrent of what I followed. 

I grew up in the suburbs, and my dad was a dentist, and everyone in my family were entrepreneurs, and my mom was a stay at home mom and then I always wanted to own my own business. I went to Eastern Michigan, graduated with a double major in journalism and economics, changed my major every six months because I just couldn’t figure out what I wanted to do with my life. Then after I graduated college, I started an internet company with my brother. This was June of 1995. 

Laurie Barkman:

On the early side of it all.

Jon Dwoskin:

On the early side, yeah. It was my brother and I and a buddy of ours, Scott. We each had our role. I was the sales guy, my brother was the creative and Scott was the day to day operations. My role was doing sales and going out there and growing the sales team because when I was 18 years old, my dad gave me a set of tapes before I got to college, and he said to me, “Jonathan, I think you’ll learn more from these people than you will college. If you get less than a three-point in college you’re coming home,” and I became addicted to these tapes; Brian Tracy psychology of success, and everything that followed after. So all through college, I studied these people every single day. I almost got a masters or a PhD in self-study. I didn’t know it at the time, I just was listening to it because it resonated with me. 

So when I graduated college and I started my company, I was able to business plan and lead that in my business because I had studied it for so long and it intuitively came naturally to me but I also had studied it. Anyway, long story short, I’ll give you the Reader’s Digest version. We built that company up to about two dozen people, sold it two years later to the largest internet professional service firm in the world, became partners of that company. Two years later when my contract was up, I left, took some time off, which we can get into later and then ultimately, I went into commercial real estate as a broker for six years. I became the top conventional guy in my office, went to then start my own business,  but got offered the opportunity to take over my office, which I did in August; August 4, ’08. Then the market crashed in September, and over the next six years grew that office to one of the most profitable in the company, and up to 45 agents, 60 some people. But then after six years after that, I was getting restless. I really wanted to start my own business. As I was getting ready to exit that company, I got offered an opportunity to go in-house for a year and restructure a 50-year-old company. So I did that for a year and then six years ago started this company coaching solopreneurs to Fortune 100 companies and everything in between all over the world and it’s the greatest. I love it.

Laurie Barkman:

That’s fantastic. What an overview, and that is, definitely something I want to rewind on. So I can just picture you going into college with your Walkman. Your headset on, not probably too differently than what I’m wearing.

Jon Dwoskin:

Oh, absolutely.

Laurie Barkman:

I think you were learning how to learn in summary, because here you are this high school kid, we think we know it all and you’re going to college, but there was also something special that I understand reading an article and preparing for this interview. There was something special you learned about yourself in listening to those tapes. Again, on the theme of learning how to learn, what did you learn about yourself?

Jon Dwoskin:

I’ve always been on a quest to learn how I learned, because I never understood how I learned. I knew I didn’t learn like other people; I could study and then fail a test. It never made sense to me. I always felt like I was smart, but I couldn’t do well in school. It was  so challenging for me and so when I was 30, I was in real estate. I had been working 100 hours a week and I finally, after about a year and a half, got $100 million worth of assets to sell in one week. It was like all these seeds that I had planted from five different clients that all landed, and I was pitching them to my Chicago offices. I’d spent hundreds of hours underwriting these deals. I mean, I knew them like the back of my hand but on a Friday, I put them to rest and then spent the weekend not looking at them. Then on Monday, had this conference call and I forgot everything. People started asking me questions, I couldn’t remember one thing.

It didn’t make sense to me so I called my therapist and I said, “I need to get some type of IQ tests,” because what happened just didn’t make sense. It didn’t make sense. People were asking me questions, I couldn’t even I couldn’t retrieve anything. Things that I knew really well. Long story short, I did this five-day test two hours a day and he said to me at the end, “You should buy the book Living With Dyslexia,” and I thought, “Well for who?” He said, “For you, because you have a learning disability. And by the way, I know you think you’re visual, but you really are more auditory than you are anything,” and so it made perfect sense to me at the time so I learned how to learn. I learned that no matter how much time I spend on something, I have to give myself five or 10 minutes to re-study it, to bring it back to the retrieval part of my brain because sometimes I can’t. 

Which is odd, because sometimes I can read a book and I don’t know if I could write a paper about it after but five years later, two years later, six months later, the information I need from that book when I’m talking to a client will just come to me. It’s kind of weird how it works but I learned that I was auditory so it made sense. All of these past – I was 30. – the past 12 years, I had been listening to all of these tapes, and my retention was so high and I learned how I was learning. I learned that that’s why it resonated so much because I was listening versus other senses so it was great. It was great for me to just put some framework around it and understand how I learned so I could just amplify that for myself.

Laurie Barkman:

Yeah, and you were 30, you didn’t know until later in life. So many people probably struggle in school and they get frustrated and there’s something about their approach that if there was somebody like, you had these tests that could help you. Imagine if you had that 10-20 years prior.

Jon Dwoskin:

I did say to my dad at the time, “Where were you and Mom?” He said, “Well, we actually did get you tested when you were 10,” but I don’t know where they got me tested. Obviously, it wasn’t the right test. 

Laurie Barkman:

So you had some successes early on in your career. That’s incredible, that you, your brother and your colleague launched this company, you sold it to US Lab, which I am familiar with from the early days of the internet. I’m one of the old timers also, not as early as 95 but I got my start in the internet in 98. You took some time off, let’s talk about that. What happened?

Jon Dwoskin:

Yeah, it was great. I had been working 100 plus hours a week since I graduated college, and I was working to the bone. I was 23 when I started the company, 25 when I sold it, 27 when I left and I felt like I was 47. I remember I didn’t have anything left in me and it was and during that time my grandfather who lived with us passed away. My mom passed away. There were just a lot of people who had passed away in my family and I felt like I was about to have – I say – I was about to have a nervous breakdown. 

I really wasn’t about to have a clinical nervous breakdown but I couldn’t do any more. I needed to just decompress. I needed to sleep in. I needed to just be on my own agenda and so I took a year and a half off. I knew intuitively – and I was fortunate that I was in a position where I could after selling my company – I knew I needed to take a year and a half off. I started a side business that I really was never into and that was just something I should never have done. Didn’t require much time but I just took a year and a half. Often in that time, I got into therapy, I slept in, I just started doing whatever I wanted to do. My whole life had been this business and prior to that, taking care of sick family members, and this and the other. I just needed time for myself to do what I wanted to do and just get back to center.

I knew intuitively that I needed a year and a half. It was a little almost a year and a half to the day when I started getting back into the workforce and it was great. Because in that time I just was able to do whatever I wanted to do. It was great and I met my now wife during that time. She was living in Chicago, even though she’s from Detroit, so I was able to just go to Chicago for a couple of weeks and then come back and do my thing and then go back to Chicago and it was great. I’m so grateful for that time because it gave me time to get grounded.

Laurie Barkman:

Then life threw you a curveball. You were newlyweds, you were getting your career moving in the direction you wanted and then you got some disappointing news. What happened then?

Jon Dwoskin:

it was interesting. When I met my wife, she was seeing a holistic doctor, Dr. Darren Weissman, who has become a buddy of mine, I’ve had him on my podcast and he taught me how to meditate. I had been meditating for many years before, but I didn’t know his meditation. I had meditation CDs that I listened to while I studied. Anyway, he taught me how to really meditate and I was meditating every day. We had just gotten married and all of a sudden, my meditation just went black. I said to my wife, “I kind of intuitively feel like I have testicular cancer. I can’t put my finger on it. I don’t have any symptoms, but I just feel it,” and I happened to be reading Lance Armstrong’s book at the time. We were like, “Well, maybe it’s just the book or this and the other,” but the feeling absolutely would not go away so I just had a checkup. This was in December and so now it’s like February, March so I called my stepbrother and I said, “Hey, I want to go to a new doctor.” Long story short, he felt a lump and I went to a urologist and the urologist said, “You’re absolutely fine.” I said, “I know but I know I’m not fine. I can just sense it so just take my blood,” he goes, “I’m so positive, you’re fine. I’m not even going to take your blood.” In hindsight, I’m a big believer in that you have to be your own doctor and I should have pushed it because I just intuitively knew. He said, “Come back in 30 days.” Well, I came back in 30 days. Long story short, he said, “You were right. You do have stage one testicular cancer.” So I think, just before I go on, I think the lesson is we have to be our own doctors, and not only just in the medical field. 

The most expensive lessons in my life have always been not listening to my gut – I know, my instincts are really good and my intuition, my gut – in those moments when I haven’t listened. That business I was talking about earlier with something I knew I didn’t want to do, but I did it. My brother and my dad wanted me to do it, and I did it. Then I ended up writing a $125,000 check to close the business. I look at it as it was a very expensive seminar in listening to your gut and so I think that’s really important. Anyway, long story short, had 70 treatments of radiation, and I was still able to have children, thank God, naturally, and I was blessed to not have an extreme case. That being said, if I didn’t go back after 30 days, what I then later found out was testicular cancer is the most curable cancer but also the fastest growing cancer in the body. It doubles in size every 30 days. So had I been laissez-faire about it and not continually listened to my instincts, it could have been a lot worse and then I decided at that point, I’m going to get into commercial real estate which is something my grandfather was always part of; in residential, a little bit in investment real estate. I always wanted to do it and then I fell into that business after that.

Laurie Barkman:

So do you think that having this scare — sometimes cancer touches a lot of our lives, we all know friends or family, unfortunately, who hopefully, they’ve survived cancer, and it changes them in some ways. They get maybe a new lease on life when they come out through the other side and they – I guess what, five years late, typically, they’re monitoring you over a period of time to make sure you’re cancer free and you celebrate that right. But does it give you a different lease on life, and is that what happened to you?

Jon Dwoskin:

For me, it was interesting my cousin I was talking to yesterday as I was sharing earlier, we were talking about this because it’s now 19 years that this happened. I was sharing, my son’s about to go to college in the fall, my daughter’s 15, it just seems like lifetimes ago but I always try to be into the mindset that it was a lesson. It doesn’t define me. It was at my 10 year checkup. For testicular cancer, you really only need five years but I did 10 years of checkups because I wanted to be extra safe. I grew up where a lot of my family was sick and they died young and so I always had this fear of death. Everybody was so like, it was so extreme growing up for people in my family. It was like someone was fine and then they got sick, and then they died. I don’t mean to laugh, it’s more of a nervous laugh but it was so extreme that this fear of death I had was just extreme. My 10 year checkup, I’m driving to Chicago, my doctor calls me and says – I don’t know why – he said this to me on the phone. I was driving to Chicago for a meeting, he said, “You’ve got to come to my office right now. Your checkup’s in a couple of days, we got your blood work back, you have cancer riddled through your entire body. I’ve never seen a case so bad, you need to get into my office immediately.” 

I picked up my wife and went to his office and he was there with this guy behind them at his computer and telling me that he’s never seen a case so bad, I have cancer riddled through my body, they need to start chemotherapy, they need to start treatment and I said, “I think you’re wrong. I just don’t sense it, I’m not feeling it,” and he said the odds of me being wrong were like one in a million. He was on the computer and my wife’s like, “What are you doing?” He’s like, “I’ve just never seen a case this bad.” I said, “Okay, I need you to do an emergency ultrasound, CAT scan, blood work because I’m just not feeling this.” They pushed back, and I at this point was like, “Listen, I’m gonna be my own doctor. Get me the tests,” and so they did. Of course, I mean, this was  completely the most freaky thing that had happened to me and my wife. We have young babies at the time, this is crazy. 

A day and a half later, as we’re waiting, thinking, I know intuitively I’m fine but thinking I’m going to die. My wife and I are at Starbucks and my doctor calls me and he says, “You’re right. We botched your blood. It was a mistake. You’re fine.” For about two and a half months that racked my world, I think for about a year it racked my wife’s world. But what it did for me was I got rid of my fear of death. Because the universe took me to the brink of one of my biggest fears and then just brought it right back and it infused me, you have to have a voice, you have to stand up for yourself, you have to be your own doctor. It made that more clear and more evidence and that is what I infused in my life and that is why I infuse it into my clients’ worlds. 

I’m all about getting unstuck so for me, one of my “stucks” in life was this fear of death and you realize that when you get unstuck from that. The additional fresh energy you get in your world, in your life, and you let go of things that are just not rational on any level and that’s what it did for me. 

Laurie Barkman:

That’s a powerful story, Jon. 

Jon Dwoskin:

Oh, thanks, Laurie.

Laurie Barkman:

That’s a powerful story. People listening are probably shaking their heads like, “Wow.” So you are your own advocate. You stood up for what you inherently knew was right. In some situations people might not have had the courage to do that. You trust your doctors that they’re gonna set the right course for you. But that was such a dire situation and you stepped forward and leaned in on it.

Jon Dwoskin:

Oh, yeah. I mean he and I think most people would have just said, “Okay, that’s fine,” but everybody has to get a second and third opinion. A couple years ago, my buddy Jim Lesinski introduced me to something called the enneagram. Have you ever taken the enneagram?

Laurie Barkman:

No.

Jon Dwoskin:

It’s an interesting personality test and it’s pretty cool. You should look into it. I just interviewed this woman who teaches enneagram and what it does is it talks about that you have an intellectual IQ, but then you have a GQ and an EQ, your gut instinct, and your intuitive instincts and I think a lot of us ignore our gut and intuition. For me, my intuition has always been really high. Since I was a kid, my gut, my intuition has always been high and so when I haven’t listened to it, it’s cost me. It could have cost me my life and it’s cost me money and so to me, it’s like getting people to tap into that is really important. You can’t take things at face value. Listen, there are family members that we love that give us bad advice and there are doctors that aren’t always right. I think doctors are great, doctors have been amazing. I love doctors, this isn’t a negative against doctors, but everybody makes a mistake, and you have to take care of yourself.

Laurie Barkman:

Let’s talk about where you are today and how you help clients. You alluded to that earlier, you’ve created a movement or you’ve written a book called The Think Big Movement, you work with clients on thinking big, and inspiring them to be their best. Why don’t you share a little bit about your experience and going through your fears, overcoming your fears and improving not only the way you see things and how you bring that to clients and how you work together to be a business whisperer.

Jon Dwoskin:

I appreciate that. I don’t know, never believe your own PR. To me, I’ve always loved business, Laurie, I’ve always loved it. Ever since I was a kid, I was just always fascinated by it and from the age of 18 wanted to be a business coach, since I put those tapes in my Walkman, as you said, which is hilarious. I always thought this is exactly what I want to do, I want to help other people get unstuck, I want to write books, I want to speak, I want to inspire people to be better. They say you teach your pain also in a way and so I think, this fear of growing up, my mom had an illness, and so you kind of grow up, my aunts died at a very young age, my mom, sister, you grow up around some of these things where I was stuck being a caregiver in a way at a very young age, because of the circumstances I was in. Getting unstuck from that is an amazing feeling and not that you don’t love the people that you’re helping, but sometimes when you’re doing it, you still feel stuck. It’s this push pull in a way. 

Through all the stages of my life where I’ve gotten unstuck, I see how amazing it is, and I see that when I work with clients. I see things because of whether it’s my DNA and my dyslexia, however it is life experience. I see things and break it down just intuitively to the simple and I think people make things very complicated sometimes and so there’s nothing more fulfilling than working with a client who’s doing something and making it so complicated and I say, “Well, hey, how about if you do it like this?” They say, “Oh my God, that’s you know, that’s life changing.”

It’s their aha moments. And so I can now I have kind of realized that my my gut instincts and my intuitive and my, my listening skills and my, my, you know, I’ll say some kind of stuff Kick skills, right? We’re, I don’t know where the gifts come from, I really sometimes don’t like I really believe in the universal energy of, you know, when I’m with a client, things just come through me, I can’t really explain it. I don’t try to explain it. I don’t really kind of share that with clients as much, but I just, but it I hear things and see things that they miss, like, literally. And so I, you know, I’ll say things to clients like, Well, what about this? How did you even pick up on that, and I don’t know, I just pick up on it. And so and so for me thinking big is about, you know, making small changes, doing small things that you that you do consistently to your big and that big is your goal that your purpose is your mission, but at the undercurrent of everything I do is to get people unstuck, get people to find their voice, get people to find their courage, get people to find their, their confidence, because I believe that everybody has more potential than that. And they just don’t know how to access it. And I have found through my years of working with business coaches, which I still do, they can access a part of me that I didn’t know was there. And it’s like, just 1% is or point oh, 1% it makes a world of difference. So if I can help focus people, if I can help get to give them ideas, which I’m a big idea person, set a vision, reverse engineer the vision, give them tools and keep them consistent in their action to get to their big as they do the small things every week. That’s great. That’s very fulfilling for me.

Laurie Barkman:

The aha moments. 

Jon Dwoskin:

It’s their aha moments. Now I have realized that my gut instincts and my intuitive and listening skills and – I’ll say psychic skills – I don’t know where the gifts come from. I really believe in the universal energy of when I’m with a client, things just come through me. I can’t really explain it, I don’t try to explain it. I don’t share that with clients as much, but I hear things and see things that they miss, like, literally. So I’ll say things to clients like, “Well, what about this?” They go, “How did you even pick up on that?” and I don’t know, I just pick up on it. So for me, thinking big is about making small changes, doing small things that you do consistently to your “big” and that big is your goal, your purpose, your mission. The undercurrent of everything I do is to get people unstuck, get people to find their voice, get people to find their courage, get people to find their confidence, because I believe that everybody has more potential than that and they just don’t know how to access it. I have found through my years of working with business coaches, which I still do, they can access a part of me that I didn’t know was there and it’s just 1% or .001% it makes a world of difference. So if I can help focus people, if I can help to give them ideas – which I’m a big idea person – set a vision, reverse engineer the vision, give them tools and keep them consistent in their action to get to their “big” as they do the small things every week, that’s great. That’s very fulfilling for me.

Laurie Barkman:

That ties in with the name of my firm, which is Small Dot Big. So I love it. We have a lot of synergy.

Jon Dwoskin:

I love the name of your company — your business.

Laurie Barkman:

Well, thank you for sharing that background. Because you talk to so many different types of executives, CEOs, business owners, C suite over the last year with the pandemic, is there anything that you’ve noticed that’s different in your coaching conversations?

Jon Dwoskin:

I think over the last year, people are realizing that they have to have more structure in their day, they have to have more structure because things are just unstructured right now. A lot of people are working from home, they’re managing from home the systems, the processes that they never had in place, because they didn’t necessarily think they had to because people were just a step away or walk away from or a floor away; getting people and working with them on time management structure and effective leadership. 

As far as communication goes, communication has changed. I love talking to you and this is amazing via Zoom and we’ve talked a couple times but I still would love to meet you in person because there’s that energy, but that’s changing and there’s like this hybrid normalcy now that is not going away anytime soon, and so teaching people how to train their people differently, talk to their people differently, give grace to their people, be more specific and measurable to exactly what they need to be doing. Not micromanaging, but being very specific and measurable in their leading activities of what they need to be doing and how to structure their day. 

I do a lot of time management keynotes, I’m not doing keynotes right now but I’ll do virtual keynotes and everybody’s trying to figure out, “How do I set goals? How do I manage my time? How do I time block? How do I structure my day?” There’s no more nine to five – it’s not a thing anymore. It’s wake up, get the kids ready, get them off to school, they’re coming home for lunch, or maybe they’re in bed or at the kitchen table. Life how we know it is different and we have to realize that and have more empathy and it’s a Yiddish word – rachmones for how we manage people. Sometimes people can have to take off three to five o’clock because they need to be with their kids and they’re working from home and then they plug back in from six to eight, or whatever it is, or after the kids go to bed. So figuring out that landscape of because a year ago, little over a year ago, most companies – I mean minus the millennial saying they wanted flex time and work from home – almost everyone was anti that whole movement and they had to adapt and pivot very quickly. Now it’s way more than the norm. I interviewed a guy yesterday, Laurie, on my podcast, who deals with a lot of artificial intelligence, who’s this brilliant guy from Brazil and I asked him, “How many years do you think COVID accelerated all of us?” and he said, “Minimum five to 10 years.”

Laurie Barkman:

A minimum five to 10 accelerated in the sense of what we expect from ourselves or accelerated around what edge?

Jon Dwoskin:

Well, I think it accelerated things, the e-commerce platform, I mean, everyone needs an e-commerce platform the way you train your people. I think it accelerated how much a company has to be online, if they need an office, talent… a lot of companies are saying, “Wait, I don’t need a sales manager. If our office is here, I can have a sales manager anywhere because most people are working part time remotely now.” So I think it just accelerated. I think overall, if I had to say, mindset as well, innovation, and how people forecast and shift and look at their business.

Laurie Barkman:

Yeah, I don’t disagree with those things. That’s why I asked the follow up qualifier, because depending who you talk to, it’s accelerated the aging process. They’re tired. A lot of business owners who have been in business for 20-30 years, they’re tired and they’re ready to sell and have a succession and transition and move on. So I think if you’re a business, that’s an ongoing concern, and you have an edge for sustainability, then yes, you’re probably motivated to find innovations and improve where you can like with e-commerce and finding new customer segments to move forward. But in a lot of other cases, we’re just tired and I appreciate what you said too, about how the nature of work is changing but let’s make this an actionable thing. I know you’re a coach and you like to do hot seat coaching. If someone’s listening and they’re thinking, “Okay, what are three things that I can take away from listening to Jon today?” What might those three things be as you look forward to 2021 and beyond?

Jon Dwoskin:

Sure. One, always know your three critical, leading, specific and measurable, again I’ll say, leading activities that you need to do every single day. We get lost, a lot of people get lost in lagging activities, admin work, things that are not growing the business and so you really got to be as specific and measurable as possible. A lot of times people just say, for example, just because it’s easy, as an example, “Make a lot of calls today, call everybody on my list,” versus saying, “Call 10 new people, reach out to these 10 past clients,” like being very specific and intentional. 

Next, become a student of your calendar, and really know how to time block and how to use your calendar as the roadmap of your business. It is absolutely critical and most people I talked to are horrible at time management, do not know how to use their calendar, do not know how to time block. When I was 18 years old, my dad came home and said, I signed you up for a Franklin Covey time management weekend,” and I was like, “I’m not going to that.” He said, “You’re going,” and I went. What that has done for me in my life has been absolutely huge and I’ve studied time management ever since and I teach a lot of time management.

Next, commit to learning every single day, even if it’s five minutes a day if it’s listening to a book, reading a book, listening to a podcast, whatever it is, you have to learn every single day, something new. Then I’ll add a fourth. You have to take quiet time every day. Quiet executive time where you maybe get into nature or meditate, whatever it is, but those are things you have to incorporate into your rituals, otherwise, you’ll just burn out.

Laurie Barkman:

I love it. Jon, those are great words of wisdom and ideas for actionable advice. If people want to get in touch with you, what’s the best way to find you?

Jon Dwoskin:

Sure. Anybody can call me on my cell 2485357796, I return every call, text, email, same day. My website is jondwoskin.com. All my social media is there. I have updated content every single day, seven days a week, a podcast – five days of live podcasting every Monday to Friday. So they can go there and they can download my book for free. You can go to Amazon and buy my book if you want, but you can download it for free on my website and my podcast is called THINK Business. I try to provide as much content as I possibly can so people can go to my website and just get a ton of information. 

One of my goals is to provide coaching to over a billion people and get them thinking big by getting them unstuck, staying consistent, and being fulfilled and so I know that by offering as much free content as I possibly can on my website, then I’ll be able to help as many people as I possibly can. Then those that want direct access we do one on one coaching and then those that maybe it’s not in their budget I have a group coaching model that can fit into everybody’s budget with live coaching with me but yeah, jondwoskin.com

Laurie Barkman:

Awesome. I love to ask all of my guests if they have a favorite quote, I’m sure you have many things that inspire you, Jon. Is there anything that comes to the forefront as a favorite quote or mantra?

Jon Dwoskin:

Tony Robbins – success minus fulfillment equals failure. I’m all about the journey of fulfillment. My book is written around that whole vibe, and I believe that we need to feel fulfilled in order to enjoy our days.

Laurie Barkman:

Absolutely. Jon, thank you so much for being on Succession Stories the What’s Next series. Appreciate you.

Jon Dwoskin:

Thank you. Appreciate you.

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